After Organization-Wide Study, Gender Pay Equity in Leon County Government Far Exceeds State and Federal Median Salaries

Thursday, June 21, 2018 | 

After Organization-Wide Study, Gender Pay Equity in Leon County Government Far Exceeds State and Federal Median Salaries

Leon County Government recently conducted a gender-based pay equity study to determine if any disparity existed between men and women in the organization. The results of the study, presented this week to the Board of County Commissioners, show that male and female County employees earn nearly the exact same median salary, with women earning slightly more than men. Based on a recent study from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Annual Income and Poverty, this far exceeds the national and state median salary gaps, where women earn 80.5% and 86.6% as much as men respectively.

“The County’s gender-based pay equity study confirms our commitment to pay equity between men and women,” said Leon County Commission Chairman Nick Maddox. “It’s important for every high-performing organization to take a moment and assess how they’re doing, and this thorough study shows that we are on the right track.”

Staff conducted an extensive review based on national best practices of the nearly 800 Leon County employees to determine pay equity within the organization. The study evaluated pay equity using a three-tiered approach: among all employees within the organization, among employees who perform the same job, and among employees who perform substantially the same work based on required knowledge, skills, and abilities.

“As an employer of choice, Leon County continues to attract and retain a highly skilled, diverse and innovative workforce,” said Leon County Administrator Vincent S. Long. “From the County’s paid parental leave to our living wage of twelve dollars an hour for all County employees, this study further reflects all the ways Leon County is an ideal organization to work for.”

To ensure the County’s hiring process continues to be equitable into the future, Leon County will also exclude information regarding salary history from the County’s employment applications. The County made this decision based on recent research on pay equity suggests that a history of lower salaries may follow a candidate throughout her/his career simply due to wages at previous jobs that may have been set unfairly. The research further shows that salary history requirements may disproportionately affect women and minority candidates.

For more information, contact Mathieu Cavell, Leon County Community and Media Relations, at (850) 606-5300 / CMR@LeonCountyFL.gov .

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